Wine
Broke

Krinklewood Vineyard

Biodynamic and beautiful it's a Broke Fordwich highlight

If you ask Rod Windrim, owner of Krinklewood Vineyard, to explain what Biodynamics is, best do it with a glass of shiraz or semillon in your hand, as this ain’t no short answer.

As Rod delves deeper into the history and science of biodynamics you can’t help but get caught up in his enthusiasm. So much so that I’m thirsty not only for more wine but thirsty for more information about Steiner and a better understanding of the sacred geometry of the Golden mean. Intense I know.

Taking a tour around Krinklewood, Rod chats about how the whole farm is a living organism, not just one crop, but each element working together to find the balance that’s required to work without the interference of chemicals. Which includes the sheep, chickens and Limousin cattle that graze amongst the vines to weed and fertilise the soil. Then there is the orchard that has everything from plums, mandarins, mulberries and the most surprising of all, the Australian native finger lime. Then of course the vegie garden that’s overflowing with beans, garlic, eggplants, strawberries, basil and the olive grove that produces Krinklewood's very own Olive Oil.

Entering the barrel room is when things get really interesting and where Rod comes into his element, explaining each of the fermenting processes Krinklewood use to create their unique flavour.

To put it simply biodynamics is better for the environment, better for the people that live and work within it, and more importantly, it gives us drinkers a better quality wine. If you can spare the time, however, the extended version is far more fascinating and explores Austrian philosopher, Rudolf Steiner, and his beliefs that every plant is influenced by the two major energy forces in the world – the earthly and the cosmic.

As Rod delves deeper into the history and science of biodynamics you can’t help but get caught up in his enthusiasm. So much so that I’m thirsty not only for more wine but thirsty for more information about Steiner and a better understanding of the sacred geometry of the Golden mean. Intense I know.

Taking a tour around Krinklewood, Rod chats about how the whole farm is a living organism, not just one crop, but each element working together to find the balance that’s required to work without the interference of chemicals. Which includes the sheep, chickens and Limousin cattle that graze amongst the vines to weed and fertilise the soil. Then there is the orchard that has everything from plums, mandarins, mulberry’s and the most surprising of all, the Australian native finger lime. Then of course the vegie garden that’s overflowing with beans, garlic, eggplants, strawberries, basil and the olive grove that produce Krinklewood's very own Olive Oil.

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There is of course the oak barrel fermentation process, but of more interest are the eggs in the corner, concrete eggs that is. Imported from Burgundy in France, this process of fermentation is one of the most traditional and is based on Aristotle’s philosophy of the Golden mean. Seriously intense but seriously interesting.

There is so much to Krinklewood this article barely scratches the surface. However there are a few other worthy mentions, those being the energetic vineyard dogs Minty and Billy, the cute-as-pie litter of piglets and Royal Easter Show Reserve Champion Bruce the boar. Last, but by no means least, there is Krinklewood's stunning cellar door that has you feeling as though you have arrived at a turn of the century Italian farmhouse. A must for every visit to the Hunter Valley.

Krinklewood Vineyard

712 Wollombi Road, Broke NSW 2330